News

Wong, a computing pioneer, urges wise technology policy

The career of Eugene Wong '55 *59 has taken him from Berkeley, Calif., where he profoundly influenced the field of computing, to Washington, D.C., where he helped craft policies that smoothed the growth of the Internet. To encourage others with technical expertise to engage in public service, he has established the Eugene Wong Fund for Engineering and Policy at Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Audrey Ellerbee '01 selected as congressional fellow, wins Golden Torch Award

Audrey Ellerbee has been selected as a AAAS Congressional Science and Engineering Fellow for 2007-08.

Andrew Persily *82 named vice president of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers

Andrew Persily was appointed vice president of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers at the society's annual meeting in June.

Thomas Truskett *01 to receive the 2007 Colburn Award

Thomas Truskett will receive the 2007 Allan P. Colburn Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers at its annual meeting in November in Salt Lake City.

N.J. Society of Professional Engineers honors engineering student with scholarship

The New Jersey Professional Engineers in Construction presented the Sol Seid Award of Excellence Scholarship to Kira Schiavello, a senior majoring in civil and environmental engineering.

Frontiers of health: Treating cancer and HIV

Aerospace engineer Robert Stengel remembers the day he realized that the theories and analyses that make space travel possible may also lead to better understanding and treatments of cancer and HIV.

Frontiers of health: Deciding factors

When faced with a decision, does the brain go for speed, or accuracy -- or some combination of the two? It depends on the situation, but in simple cases an optimal combination can be found. Philip Holmes, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and applied mathematics, is working as part of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute to study this and similar questions. The work could ultimately advance the diagnosis and treatment of a host of psychological problems.

Frontiers of health: Catching rule-breakers

Celeste Nelson is out to determine the rules that govern normal development so she can stop the cancer cells that don't play by them. Currently studying mammary gland development and breast cancer at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nelson is funded by a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface. She will join the University faculty in the fall as an assistant professor of chemical engineering.

Quest for ancient coins inspires a book and a course

Computer scientist Ken Steiglitz is happy to admit that he is an eBay addict. For starters, his pre-dawn "grazing" on the popular Internet trading site has yielded a trove of ancient bronze coins to add to his personal collection. Even more, he has discovered a wealth of information to advance the field of auction theory, which lies at the intersection of computer science, economics, mathematics and psychology.

'Orange Bowl'

Despite a January freeze in California responsible for $1 billion in lost orange crops, a team of Princeton students has managed to earn more than $1 trillion in the orange juice business this year. The student team, Jin & Juice, made their record-breaking profit during a competition unique to Princeton known as the "Orange Bowl."

Pages