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Frontiers of health: Catching rule-breakers

Celeste Nelson is out to determine the rules that govern normal development so she can stop the cancer cells that don't play by them. Currently studying mammary gland development and breast cancer at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nelson is funded by a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface. She will join the University faculty in the fall as an assistant professor of chemical engineering.

Quest for ancient coins inspires a book and a course

Computer scientist Ken Steiglitz is happy to admit that he is an eBay addict. For starters, his pre-dawn "grazing" on the popular Internet trading site has yielded a trove of ancient bronze coins to add to his personal collection. Even more, he has discovered a wealth of information to advance the field of auction theory, which lies at the intersection of computer science, economics, mathematics and psychology.

Frontiers of health: Stacking the odds

The bookshelf of Jianqing Fan, the Frederick L. Moore Class of 1918 Professor in Finance, is filled with books about finance, treatises on econometrics -- and massive tomes on cellular biology and biochemistry.

'Orange Bowl'

Despite a January freeze in California responsible for $1 billion in lost orange crops, a team of Princeton students has managed to earn more than $1 trillion in the orange juice business this year. The student team, Jin & Juice, made their record-breaking profit during a competition unique to Princeton known as the "Orange Bowl."

Latrobe Prize supports plan to transform upper New York Harbor

One of the most coveted prizes in architecture was awarded in March to a team of Princeton architects and engineers for an ambitious plan to transform the Upper Bay of New York Harbor. The Latrobe Prize, a $100,000 purse awarded every other year by the American Institute of Architects, went to Princeton’s Center for Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. The winning project team is led by Guy Nordenson, professor of architecture and affiliated professor of civil and environmental engi

Frontiers of health: Programming cells

Engineer Ron Weiss' knowledge of circuits and biologist Ihor Lemischka's expertise in stem cells are a potent combination -- one that may lead to medical breakthroughs for diabetes and spinal cord injuries.

Frontiers of health: Durable drugs

Fundamental approach targets practical problem Designing effective drugs and vaccines to combat and prevent disease is only half the battle—they also have to be formulated effectively for shipping and storage, which is where Pablo Debenedetti and Athanassios Panagiotopoulos come in. The chemical engineering professors use a combination of theoretical, computational and experimental techniques to explore how proteins behave in the presence of certain sugars that are often used as stabiliz

Frontiers of health: Advances in medicine emerge at intersection of engineering and biology

Revolutionary cancer treatments. Potent HIV drugs. Diabetes-fighting stem cells. Princeton engineers are bringing new and often unexpected perspectives to bear in developing these and an array of other medical breakthroughs, while advancing the basic understanding of biology. They are the vanguard of an emerging discipline that links engineering and biology -- with human health as the beneficiary.

Invest in education, people and the future, say Xerox and Amazon execs

A failure to invest in science and engineering education could have dire consequences in today's global economy, said corporate leaders from Xerox Corp. and Amazon.com in separate April addresses at Princeton.

Frontiers of health: Following the map

Mona Singh doesn't use the maps in her office to get from point A to point B -- she uses them to find meaning hidden in biological data, which may help advance the understanding of disease at the genetic level.

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