News

Quest for ancient coins inspires a book and a course

Computer scientist Ken Steiglitz is happy to admit that he is an eBay addict. For starters, his pre-dawn "grazing" on the popular Internet trading site has yielded a trove of ancient bronze coins to add to his personal collection. Even more, he has discovered a wealth of information to advance the field of auction theory, which lies at the intersection of computer science, economics, mathematics and psychology.

Frontiers of health: Taking the scenic route

It might seem easy to visually distinguish between a kitchen and a beach, but Fei Fei Li recognizes the inherent complexity in telling sink from sand. Her research to understand the brain processes involved may ultimately enhance treatments for visual impairments and brain damage.

Frontiers of health: Deep into the surface

Mikko Haataja, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, views cell membranes as "very complicated beasts." As the beasts can't always be explored experimentally, he uses computer simulations to probe deep into their structure and function.

Frontiers of health: Deep in data

"We have millions of times more biological data now than we did just a few years ago," says Olga Troyanskaya. "But we don't know millions of times more about biology -- at least, not yet. The assistant professor of computer science and genomics is doing her part to change that by designing computer systems that analyze massive amounts of genetic data. The freely available systems are providing researchers throughout the world with the ability to generate new insights into cancer and a multi

For computers or humans, theory of learning inspires unusual mix of subjects

This year marks the 10th anniversary of a class that yokes two very unlikely subjects -- philosophy and engineering.

Felten and Internet experts ponder privacy issues

Ed Felten opened a Reunions 2007 panel discussion on Internet privacy by showing images from Google's new map service called "Street View."

Hypersonics expert whisks students to the leading edge of aeronautics

If asking students to design an airplane doesn't seem challenging enough, how about a supersonic jet? No, how about a "global hyperliner," a vehicle that could carry a person out of the atmosphere and nearly halfway around the world in three hours?

Female graduate enrollment reaches record high

The number of women enrolling in graduate school at Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science will reach a record 32 percent of students in the fall of 2007. By contrast, the nationwide average of women enrolled in graduate engineering hovers at around 20 percent.

Franklin Moss '71 named to Princeton University's board of trustees

Princeton University recently named Franklin Moss, who graduated from Princeton in 1971 with a B.S.E. in mechanical and aerospace engineering, as one of six new members on its Board of Trustees.

Preston Haskell '60 supports Jacksonville mentoring program

Preston Haskell is one of three people spearheading the "Drive for 5" campaign to increase the number of volunteer mentors from corporations in the community to tutor school children in Jacksonville, Florida.

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