News

Frontiers of health: Detecting disease

Medical devices that require nothing more than a single breath to instantaneously detect a number of ailments, including diabetes and kidney disease, are just what the doctor ordered. And, they are exactly what researchers are developing as part of the Center for Mid- Infrared Technologies for Health and the Environment (MIRTHE). Claire Gmachl

Frontiers of health: Harmony in music and medicine

There are medical benefits to be found at the intersection of music and technology, according to Perry Cook. He should know -- he lives there.

Frontiers of health: Solving the protein puzzle

Chemical engineer Christodoulos Floudas is rather like the proteins he studies -- able to perform a variety of functions that have major implications for human health. His current research promises to advance the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV and diabetes, among other diseases.

Top U.S. and Princeton honors go to engineering students

Engineering students won several of the nation's and Princeton's top academic honors this year, including Marshall and Goldwater scholarships and the highest student prize in the field of computer science.

Frontiers of health: Moving pictures

Advances in medical imaging have added a new dimension, literally, to the research of Peter Ramadge, chair of electrical engineering. Rather than working with two-dimensional videos from cameras (his longtime area of expertise), Ramadge is analyzing three-dimensional movies of brain activity that are collected by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. His work, in collaboration with the Center for the Study of Brain Mind and Behavior of the newly created Princeton Neuroscienc

Frontiers of health: Treating cancer and HIV

Aerospace engineer Robert Stengel remembers the day he realized that the theories and analyses that make space travel possible may also lead to better understanding and treatments of cancer and HIV.

Frontiers of health: Deciding factors

When faced with a decision, does the brain go for speed, or accuracy -- or some combination of the two? It depends on the situation, but in simple cases an optimal combination can be found. Philip Holmes, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and applied mathematics, is working as part of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute to study this and similar questions. The work could ultimately advance the diagnosis and treatment of a host of psychological problems.

Frontiers of health: Catching rule-breakers

Celeste Nelson is out to determine the rules that govern normal development so she can stop the cancer cells that don't play by them. Currently studying mammary gland development and breast cancer at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nelson is funded by a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface. She will join the University faculty in the fall as an assistant professor of chemical engineering.

For computers or humans, theory of learning inspires unusual mix of subjects

This year marks the 10th anniversary of a class that yokes two very unlikely subjects -- philosophy and engineering.

Felten and Internet experts ponder privacy issues

Ed Felten opened a Reunions 2007 panel discussion on Internet privacy by showing images from Google's new map service called "Street View."

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