News

Princeton's self-driving car selected as semifinalist in DARPA competition

Princeton undergraduates who have engineered a self-driving car designed to navigate city streets without human help have been selected as semifinalists in a hotly contested Pentagon competition with top prizes worth $3.5 million.

Satellite system may give ecologists a bird's-eye view

Aerospace engineering professor Jeremy Kasdin usually designs space systems to search for distant planets, but his latest endeavor is on the lookout for creatures close to Earth.

Wong, a computing pioneer, urges wise technology policy

The career of Eugene Wong '55 *59 has taken him from Berkeley, Calif., where he profoundly influenced the field of computing, to Washington, D.C., where he helped craft policies that smoothed the growth of the Internet. To encourage others with technical expertise to engage in public service, he has established the Eugene Wong Fund for Engineering and Policy at Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Andrew Persily *82 named vice president of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers

Andrew Persily was appointed vice president of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers at the society's annual meeting in June.

Thomas Truskett *01 to receive the 2007 Colburn Award

Thomas Truskett will receive the 2007 Allan P. Colburn Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers at its annual meeting in November in Salt Lake City.

Audrey Ellerbee '01 selected as congressional fellow, wins Golden Torch Award

Audrey Ellerbee has been selected as a AAAS Congressional Science and Engineering Fellow for 2007-08.

N.J. Society of Professional Engineers honors engineering student with scholarship

The New Jersey Professional Engineers in Construction presented the Sol Seid Award of Excellence Scholarship to Kira Schiavello, a senior majoring in civil and environmental engineering.

Frontiers of health: Advances in medicine emerge at intersection of engineering and biology

Revolutionary cancer treatments. Potent HIV drugs. Diabetes-fighting stem cells. Princeton engineers are bringing new and often unexpected perspectives to bear in developing these and an array of other medical breakthroughs, while advancing the basic understanding of biology. They are the vanguard of an emerging discipline that links engineering and biology -- with human health as the beneficiary.

Latrobe Prize supports plan to transform upper New York Harbor

One of the most coveted prizes in architecture was awarded in March to a team of Princeton architects and engineers for an ambitious plan to transform the Upper Bay of New York Harbor. The Latrobe Prize, a $100,000 purse awarded every other year by the American Institute of Architects, went to Princeton’s Center for Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. The winning project team is led by Guy Nordenson, professor of architecture and affiliated professor of civil and environmental engi

Frontiers of health: Programming cells

Engineer Ron Weiss' knowledge of circuits and biologist Ihor Lemischka's expertise in stem cells are a potent combination -- one that may lead to medical breakthroughs for diabetes and spinal cord injuries.

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