News

Frontiers of health: Bugs for drugs

Bacteria have to work to earn their keep in the lab of David Wood, assistant professor of chemical engineering. Designed to respond to human hormones, the busy bugs may help identify new compounds to treat endocrine problems, including Graves' disease and estrogen-related disorders.

Frontiers of health: Deciding factors

When faced with a decision, does the brain go for speed, or accuracy -- or some combination of the two? It depends on the situation, but in simple cases an optimal combination can be found. Philip Holmes, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and applied mathematics, is working as part of the Princeton Neuroscience Institute to study this and similar questions. The work could ultimately advance the diagnosis and treatment of a host of psychological problems.

Frontiers of health: Catching rule-breakers

Celeste Nelson is out to determine the rules that govern normal development so she can stop the cancer cells that don't play by them. Currently studying mammary gland development and breast cancer at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nelson is funded by a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface. She will join the University faculty in the fall as an assistant professor of chemical engineering.

Frontiers of health: Deep in data

"We have millions of times more biological data now than we did just a few years ago," says Olga Troyanskaya. "But we don't know millions of times more about biology -- at least, not yet. The assistant professor of computer science and genomics is doing her part to change that by designing computer systems that analyze massive amounts of genetic data. The freely available systems are providing researchers throughout the world with the ability to generate new insights into cancer and a multi

Quest for ancient coins inspires a book and a course

Computer scientist Ken Steiglitz is happy to admit that he is an eBay addict. For starters, his pre-dawn "grazing" on the popular Internet trading site has yielded a trove of ancient bronze coins to add to his personal collection. Even more, he has discovered a wealth of information to advance the field of auction theory, which lies at the intersection of computer science, economics, mathematics and psychology.

Frontiers of health: Stacking the odds

The bookshelf of Jianqing Fan, the Frederick L. Moore Class of 1918 Professor in Finance, is filled with books about finance, treatises on econometrics -- and massive tomes on cellular biology and biochemistry.

For computers or humans, theory of learning inspires unusual mix of subjects

This year marks the 10th anniversary of a class that yokes two very unlikely subjects -- philosophy and engineering.

Felten and Internet experts ponder privacy issues

Ed Felten opened a Reunions 2007 panel discussion on Internet privacy by showing images from Google's new map service called "Street View."

Chou recognized as nanotechnology pioneer

Stephen Chou, the Joseph C. Elgin Professor of Engineering, was recently honored for his contributions to the nanotechnology field with a Nano 50 award from Nanotech Briefs magazine.

Amy Alving *88 appointed chief scientist at Science Applications International Corp.

The Science Applications International Corp. recently appointed Amy Alving as its chief scientist.

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