News

Daniel Warmenhoven '72 named to Aruba Networks board

Aruba Networks of Sunnyvale, Calif., a secure wireless access provider, recently named Daniel Warmenhoven to its board of directors.

Myers *88 to serve on fossil fuels committee of the World Energy Council

David Myers has been appointed to serve on the Cleaner Fossil Fuels Committee of the World Energy Council, a London-based charity organization with member committees in more than 90 countries, including most of the largest energy-producing and energy-consuming countries.

Former associate dean Richard Golden *54 dies

Richard Golden, former associate dean for administration of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, died at his home in Princeton early Wednesday morning at age 76.

New machine forges research partnerships, a billionth of a meter at a time

Princeton's newly acquired e-beam writer functions on a scale of billionths of a meter, but its reach extends across campus and beyond, enhancing the University's nanotechnology facilities and enabling collaborative interdisciplinary research projects.

Step on the gas: New fuel cell design adds control, reduces complexity

When Princeton University engineers want to increase the power output of their new fuel cell, they just give it a little more gas -- hydrogen gas, to be exact. Though the simple control mechanism was previously thought impossible, Jay Benziger, a professor of chemical engineering, and Claire Woo, who graduated in 2006, showed it can work.

Engineering professor named to national "Grand Challenges" committee

The National Academy of Engineering has named Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, to a prestigious international committee to identify the greatest challenges and opportunities for engineering in the 21st century.

Science Olympiad, hosted by Princeton, inspires teachers and students

On Tuesday, Jan. 9, hundreds of young scholars solved engineering problems, conducted detailed scientific experiments -- and launched a catapult attack on a small castle in the lobby of Jadwin Gymnasium. The budding scientists were participants in a regional tournament of the New Jersey Science Olympiad, a hands-on science competition that assesses scientific knowledge and ability, hosted by Princeton University.

Stock options may cost shareholders much less than previously thought

Controversial stock options for company executives may be much less costly to shareholders than current mathematical models suggest, according to research presented Jan. 5 by Tim Leung of Princeton's Department of Operations Research and Financial Engineering.

Laser experiments reveal strange properties of superfluids

Princeton University electrical engineers are using lasers to shed light on the behavior of superfluids -- strange, frictionless liquids that are difficult to create and study. Their technique allows them to simulate experiments that are difficult or impossible to conduct with superfluids.

Suckewer wins Schawlow Prize for laser research

The American Physical Society has selected Szymon Suckewer, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and co-director of the Program in Plasma Science and Technology, to receive the 2007 Arthur Schawlow Prize in Laser Science.

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