News

Frontiers of health: Deep in data

"We have millions of times more biological data now than we did just a few years ago," says Olga Troyanskaya. "But we don't know millions of times more about biology -- at least, not yet. The assistant professor of computer science and genomics is doing her part to change that by designing computer systems that analyze massive amounts of genetic data. The freely available systems are providing researchers throughout the world with the ability to generate new insights into cancer and a multi

Invest in education, people and the future, say Xerox and Amazon execs

A failure to invest in science and engineering education could have dire consequences in today's global economy, said corporate leaders from Xerox Corp. and Amazon.com in separate April addresses at Princeton.

Frontiers of health: Following the map

Mona Singh doesn't use the maps in her office to get from point A to point B -- she uses them to find meaning hidden in biological data, which may help advance the understanding of disease at the genetic level.

Dean's Message - Frontiers of Health

Focus on fundamentals yields broad societal benefits Why is an aerospace engineer who developed control systems for a lunar module investigating the genetics of cancer? How did an expert in statistical finance come to identify genes involved in childhood tumors? In part, these unexpected combinations reflect the interdisciplinary approach that is increasingly common in academics: Solving complex problems often requires collaborations among people with different perspectives. At Princeton, ther

Frontiers of health: New spin on heart valves

In a roundabout way, propellers advanced Julie Young's latest project—a new and improved heart valve replacement. "The blades of a propeller look very much like the leaflets in a mechanical heart valve," said Young, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, who studied propellers for her Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Texas at Austin. "The same principles apply on a much smaller scale."

Smits returns as mechanical and aerospace chair

Alexander Smits will become chair of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering as of July 1, returning to the position he held from 1998 to 2004.

Frontiers of health: Sight for sore eyes

Szymon Suckewer needs eye surgery, but he's not going under the knife just yet -- he'd rather wait until no knife is necessary. Having recently developed an incision-free eye surgery technique, he's confident that will soon be an option.

For computers or humans, theory of learning inspires unusual mix of subjects

This year marks the 10th anniversary of a class that yokes two very unlikely subjects -- philosophy and engineering.

Felten and Internet experts ponder privacy issues

Ed Felten opened a Reunions 2007 panel discussion on Internet privacy by showing images from Google's new map service called "Street View."

Engineering dean wins IEEE best paper award

Dean of Engineering H. Vincent Poor will receive the 2007 IEEE Guglielmo Marconi Best Paper Award, sponsored by Qualcomm, Inc. The annual award is given for an original paper in the field of wireless communications published in the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, selected based upon its originality, utility, timeliness and clarity of presentation.

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