Swamp microbe has pollution-munching power

A bacterium discovered by Princeton researchers in a New Jersey swamp may offer a more efficient method for treating toxins found in sewage, fertilizer runoff and other forms of water pollution.

The democratic frontiers of artificial intelligence

The Center for Information Technology Policy recently co-hosted the AI and Ethics conference, focusing on a range of topics at the intersection of computer science, public policy, political theory and philosophy.

Experts call for national and corporate action to combat disinformation on social media

The business model of American social media allows foreign adversaries to exploit our open society by spreading disinformation and amplifying disagreements, turning citizens against one another, speakers said at a Princeton University forum on Saturday.

David Billington, scholar of structural art, dies at 90

David P. Billington, whose scholarship found elegance and beauty in practical works of engineering, died in Los Angeles on March 25. He was 90.

Princeton senior Fatehkia uses big data to examine global digital gender gap

While most young people use social media to be social, Princeton senior Masoomali Fatehkia is using it to advance social good.

Tiny particles, big machines

Students in the course “Laboratory Techniques in Materials Science and Engineering” are learning how to use large and sophisticated pieces of equipment to probe materials that are several times smaller than the width of a human hair.

'A million nuclear plants' in cross-section of human hair: Grad student honored for pioneering research

Matthew Edwards, a doctoral student and undergraduate alumnus in mechanical and aerospace engineering, is one of four winners of this year’s Porter Ogden Jacobus Fellowship, Princeton University’s top honor for graduate students.

Researchers use light to turn yeast into biochemical factories

Princeton researchers have used light to control genetically modified yeast and increase its output of commercially valuable chemicals. The results offer scientists a powerful new tool to probe and understand the inner working of cells.

The future of flow: Innovators pitch research ready to move from lab to market

An advanced flowmeter wins first place among nine teams in the 2018 Innovation Forum

New material could lower cost of carbon capture

A team of Princeton Engineering researchers has developed a method based on theoretical calculations they believe could drive down the cost of carbon capture. Rather than the common method of absorbing the carbon dioxide in a liquid chemical solution like amine, the researchers, led by Claire White, propose using a sheet of material to which the CO2 sticks.

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