News

Princeton launches Program in Sustainable Energy to address global need

With the energy crisis becoming ever more urgent, Princeton has established a new Program in Sustainable Energy to provide students with the quantitative skills and interdisciplinary perspective needed to develop innovative energy systems for the future.

Anderson gift supports professorship in energy and environment

A new professorship endowed by a gift from Dwight Anderson, a 1989 Princeton alumnus, is part of the University's comprehensive initiative to address critical issues of energy and the environment in the 21st century. The Anderson Family Professorship in Energy and the Environment will support a tenured faculty member in the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Gift of $100 million to transform energy and environment research at Princeton

Gerhard R. (Gerry) Andlinger, an alumnus and noted international business executive, has made a gift to Princeton University to accelerate research on effective and sustainable solutions to problems of energy and the environment. Princeton will use the gift, which will total $100 million, to create the Gerhard R. Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment within the School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Trap and zap: Harnessing the power of light to pattern surfaces on the nanoscale

Princeton engineers have invented an affordable technique that uses lasers and plastic beads to create the ultrasmall features that are needed for new generations of microchips.

Women in theoretical computer science gather at Princeton

Responding to the need for more women in theoretical computer science, Princeton University hosted the Women in Theory Workshop from June 14 to 18 to bring together female graduate students and leading researchers in the field.

Engineering expo entrances high school girls in New York

One hundred New York City high school girls screamed in unison as they watched a tower built out of spaghetti collapse into a heap. Gathered in New York University's Kimmel Center on May 5, the students -- a mix of ninth and tenth graders from public and private schools -- were participating in a towerbuilding competition as part of a day-long expo designed to introduce them to engineering.

A freshman with his own company? Make that two...

Sophomore engineering student Seth Priebatsch has a new way to spell success: SCVNGR. His latest entrepreneurial venture, SCVNGR garnered Priebatsch a first-place finish in this year's TigerLaunch Business Plan Competition for students. His winning idea is to create 21st-century scavenger hunts by sending clues to players and keeping tabs on their whereabouts using mobile phone text messaging systems. Judges at the University weren't the only ones impressed with the idea, which Priebatsch deve

From ice cream to vaccines, course teaches 'learning'

When students get their hands on Peter Frazier's research, they use it for everything from planning a more profitable ice cream business to designing space ships. But Frazier likes explain his work this way: Suppose you have just moved to Manhattan and are trying to figure out the fastest way to get from your new apartment to your new job. You search the Internet and find a number of different routes. Which path is best? Is it better to ride your bike or take a bus? How likely is it that you

Engineers without Borders changes lives -- here and abroad

Princeton University students traveled to Huamanzana, Peru, this summer to install wood-burning stoves in 35 homes. The stoves, developed by the students, will replace open-pit cooking fires, which fill the homes with smoke and cause respiratory illnesses.

Alternative curriculum integrates and enlivens freshman requirements

An experimental series of courses that integrates math, physics and hands-on engineering into a unified alternative freshman track has now become an established part of the curriculum. Freshman year is a critical time for engineers -- they gain the fundamental mathematical and physical foundations for their later studies, while making crucial decisions about the field in which they would like to concentrate. Yet the conventional freshman curriculum gives engineers only a glimpse of the exciting

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