News

Quest for ancient coins inspires a book and a course

Computer scientist Ken Steiglitz is happy to admit that he is an eBay addict. For starters, his pre-dawn "grazing" on the popular Internet trading site has yielded a trove of ancient bronze coins to add to his personal collection. Even more, he has discovered a wealth of information to advance the field of auction theory, which lies at the intersection of computer science, economics, mathematics and psychology.

Frontiers of health: Deep into the surface

Mikko Haataja, assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, views cell membranes as "very complicated beasts." As the beasts can't always be explored experimentally, he uses computer simulations to probe deep into their structure and function.

Frontiers of health: Sorting the 'biological haystack'

Ten years ago, it would take ten days for Princeton biologist Edward Cox to separate a million base pair fragments of DNA by size -- soon, he may be able to do it ten seconds, thanks to micron-sized devices being developed by a team of engineers, biologists and physicists.

Frontiers of health: Harmony in music and medicine

There are medical benefits to be found at the intersection of music and technology, according to Perry Cook. He should know -- he lives there.

Frontiers of health: Deflecting damage

Flexible electronics being developed in Sigurd Wagner's lab are supple not only in form, but in function. The pliant systems -- first developed for bendable video displays -- have applications in brain injury research, tissue engineering and the development of next-generation prosthetics.

'Orange Bowl'

Despite a January freeze in California responsible for $1 billion in lost orange crops, a team of Princeton students has managed to earn more than $1 trillion in the orange juice business this year. The student team, Jin & Juice, made their record-breaking profit during a competition unique to Princeton known as the "Orange Bowl."

Frontiers of health: Solving the protein puzzle

Chemical engineer Christodoulos Floudas is rather like the proteins he studies -- able to perform a variety of functions that have major implications for human health. His current research promises to advance the understanding and treatment of cancer, HIV and diabetes, among other diseases.

Top U.S. and Princeton honors go to engineering students

Engineering students won several of the nation's and Princeton's top academic honors this year, including Marshall and Goldwater scholarships and the highest student prize in the field of computer science.

Frontiers of health: Moving pictures

Advances in medical imaging have added a new dimension, literally, to the research of Peter Ramadge, chair of electrical engineering. Rather than working with two-dimensional videos from cameras (his longtime area of expertise), Ramadge is analyzing three-dimensional movies of brain activity that are collected by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. His work, in collaboration with the Center for the Study of Brain Mind and Behavior of the newly created Princeton Neuroscienc

Frontiers of health: Advances in medicine emerge at intersection of engineering and biology

Revolutionary cancer treatments. Potent HIV drugs. Diabetes-fighting stem cells. Princeton engineers are bringing new and often unexpected perspectives to bear in developing these and an array of other medical breakthroughs, while advancing the basic understanding of biology. They are the vanguard of an emerging discipline that links engineering and biology -- with human health as the beneficiary.

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