News

Frontiers of health: Killer proteins

Powerful proteins that are able to kill bacteria and viruses already exist in nature, but Kyle Vanderlick wants to make them even stronger. The chair of the chemical engineering department, Vanderlick conducts research on antimicrobial peptides -- short proteins that destroy disease-causing bugs by breaking down the membranes that surround them. The work, done in collaboration with biologists at the University of California, Irvine, could ultimately lead to the development of powerful new mic

Frontiers of health: Treating cancer and HIV

Aerospace engineer Robert Stengel remembers the day he realized that the theories and analyses that make space travel possible may also lead to better understanding and treatments of cancer and HIV.

Latrobe Prize supports plan to transform upper New York Harbor

One of the most coveted prizes in architecture was awarded in March to a team of Princeton architects and engineers for an ambitious plan to transform the Upper Bay of New York Harbor. The Latrobe Prize, a $100,000 purse awarded every other year by the American Institute of Architects, went to Princeton’s Center for Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. The winning project team is led by Guy Nordenson, professor of architecture and affiliated professor of civil and environmental engi

Frontiers of health: Moving pictures

Advances in medical imaging have added a new dimension, literally, to the research of Peter Ramadge, chair of electrical engineering. Rather than working with two-dimensional videos from cameras (his longtime area of expertise), Ramadge is analyzing three-dimensional movies of brain activity that are collected by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner. His work, in collaboration with the Center for the Study of Brain Mind and Behavior of the newly created Princeton Neuroscienc

Frontiers of health: New spin on heart valves

In a roundabout way, propellers advanced Julie Young's latest project—a new and improved heart valve replacement. "The blades of a propeller look very much like the leaflets in a mechanical heart valve," said Young, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, who studied propellers for her Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Texas at Austin. "The same principles apply on a much smaller scale."

For computers or humans, theory of learning inspires unusual mix of subjects

This year marks the 10th anniversary of a class that yokes two very unlikely subjects -- philosophy and engineering.

Felten and Internet experts ponder privacy issues

Ed Felten opened a Reunions 2007 panel discussion on Internet privacy by showing images from Google's new map service called "Street View."

Borg Award recognizes Peh's research and outreach

Li-Shiuan Peh has been named the winner of the 2007 Anita Borg Early Career Award by the Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research.

Preston Haskell '60 supports Jacksonville mentoring program

Preston Haskell is one of three people spearheading the "Drive for 5" campaign to increase the number of volunteer mentors from corporations in the community to tutor school children in Jacksonville, Florida.

Female graduate enrollment reaches record high

The number of women enrolling in graduate school at Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science will reach a record 32 percent of students in the fall of 2007. By contrast, the nationwide average of women enrolled in graduate engineering hovers at around 20 percent.

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