News

Your movements are being tracked down to the inch: Colleen Josephson and Yan Shvartzshnaider

Our guests today, Yan Shvartzshnaider and Colleen Josephson, discuss how a new technology embedded in newer Apple iPhones has the technology to track the owner's movements, down to the inch, indoors.

 

Why YouTube review videos are often really paid ads (and how you can tell the difference): Michael Swart, Princeton Class of 2019

Our guest on "Cookies" today, Michael Swart, says a lot of YouTube review videos are practically paid commercials without even telling you. And he has a way to tell the difference.

How secure is the internet from attacks?

Jennifer Rexford, chair of the Princeton University Computer Science Department, visits the podcast to discuss what kind of vulnerabilities exist in the Internet that allow hackers to exploit its weaknesses.

Episode 3: Bulletproofing the Ballot Box

There’s been a lot of anxiety lately about the security of the American balloting infrastructure, but Andrew Appel has been thinking about this question for years. He has research specialties in public policy and security and privacy. He’s a well-known specialist in election technology. 

Episode 2: Why Online Media Platforms Get You Hooked

This is the second half of our conversation with Arvind Narayanan, associate professor of computer science here at the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Episode 1: How Consumer Tech Can Manipulate You (and Take Your Data)

While we're using electronic gadgets, apps, platforms and websites, they are often using us as well, including tracking our personal data. The premiere episode of our new podcast features Arvind Narayanan, associate professor of computer science here at the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Russakovsky recognized for fighting bias and advancing diversity in AI research

Olga Russakovsky, an assistant professor of computer science, has been recognized with two early-career awards from organizations that promote diversity in technical fields. The awards honor her contributions in research, education and outreach.

Multi-year datasets suggest projecting outcomes of people’s lives with AI isn’t so simple

The machine learning techniques scientists use to predict outcomes from large datasets may fall short when it comes to projecting the outcomes of people’s lives, according to a mass collaborative study led by researchers at Princeton.

Student projects use computing to ensure technology serves society

At the Center for Information Technology Policy, graduate student projects demonstrate an emphasis "not just on coding and technology, but on the effect of technology on society as a whole and the impact it can have on your everyday life."

Protecting smart machines from smart attacks

Machines' ability to learn by processing data gleaned from sensors underlies automated vehicles, medical devices and a host of other emerging technologies. But that learning ability leaves systems vulnerable to hackers in unexpected ways, researchers at Princeton University have found.

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