News

Top process systems engineer Christos Maravelias joins the faculty, expands energy systems research

Christos Maravelias, an expert in process systems engineering, has joined the Princeton faculty as of September 1, 2020. Maravelias is the Anderson Family Professor in Energy and the Environment and a professor of chemical and biological engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. 

Engineering students honored for academic achievement

Princeton University celebrated the academic accomplishments of its students with the awarding of four undergraduate prizes to seven students, including four engineering students. While the annual prizes are typically awarded at Opening Exercises, there was no ceremony this year due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Comprehensive look at U.S. fuel economy standards shows big savings on fuel and emissions

In one of the first comprehensive assessments of the fuel economy standards in the United States, Princeton University researchers found that, over their 40-year history, the standards helped reduce reliance on foreign oil producers, cut greenhouse gas emissions, and saved consumers money.

The multiple benefits of a world without air conditioning

To demonstrate the effect of radiant cooling, Forrest Meggers, assistant professor of architecture and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, and a team of researchers built a “Cold Tube,” in Singapore last year

Flipping light on-off turns bacteria into chemical factories

Working in E. coli, the workhorse organism for scientists to engineer metabolism, researchers developed a system that uses light to control one of the key genetic circuits needed to turn bacteria into chemical factories that produce valuable compounds such as the biofuel isobutanol.

Tough, timely and team-driven: 50 years of energy research

For a half-century, Princeton faculty members have been tackling critical environmental problems involving energy systems and decarbonization.

Controlling heat opens door for next-generation lighting and displays in perovskite LEDs

A team of Princeton researchers have significantly improved the stability and performance of a promising new materials for brighter, less expensive, more sustainably produced LEDs. The trick was carefully managing the heat generated by the LEDs.

New tools catch and release cellular targets at the flip of a light switch

A Princeton team has developed a class of light-switchable, highly adaptable molecular tools with new capabilities to control cellular activities. The antibody-like proteins, called OptoBinders, have potential applications including protein purification, the improved production of biofuels, and new types of targeted cancer therapies.

Funding the next big idea: New projects receive Dean for Research Innovation awards

Several projects that push the boundaries of knowledge and have high potential for impact have been awarded support through Princeton’s Dean for Research Innovation Fund.

Senior thesis project probes intricacies of groundwater cleanup

Audrey Shih’s thesis focused on specially formulated chain-like molecules called polymers that can help flush contaminants from hard-to-reach crevices in underground aquifers. How these polymers move through porous rocks to dislodge pollutants — and why they are more effective in some settings than in others — is not well understood.

Pages