News

Your movements are being tracked down to the inch: Colleen Josephson and Yan Shvartzshnaider

Our guests today, Yan Shvartzshnaider and Colleen Josephson, discuss how a new technology embedded in newer Apple iPhones has the technology to track the owner's movements, down to the inch, indoors.

 

Dean Andrea Goldsmith welcomes you to Princeton Engineering

In this video, Dean Andrea Goldsmith provides an overview of what makes Princeton Engineering special.

How artificial intelligence can be turned against us: Prateek Mittal, associate professor of electrical engineering

Prateek Mittal, associate professor of electrical engineering at Princeton University, is here to discuss his team's research into how hackers can use adversarial tactics toward artificial intelligence to take advantage of us and our data.

Why YouTube review videos are often really paid ads (and how you can tell the difference): Michael Swart, Princeton Class of 2019

Our guest on "Cookies" today, Michael Swart, says a lot of YouTube review videos are practically paid commercials without even telling you. And he has a way to tell the difference.

Students step up summer research, with increased support, amid pandemic’s challenges

For undergraduates in the engineering school, summer often means a chance to apply their learning in new ways, whether conducting field research, working in industry or volunteering abroad. Last summer, with the COVID-19 pandemic disrupting many of these plans, some students’ research projects took them in unexpected directions.

Tool helps clear biases from computer vision

Researchers at Princeton University have developed a tool that flags potential biases in sets of images used to train artificial intelligence (AI) systems. The work is part of a larger effort to remedy and prevent the biases that have crept into AI systems that influence everything from credit services to courtroom sentencing programs.

How secure is the internet from attacks?

Jennifer Rexford, chair of the Princeton University Computer Science Department, visits the podcast to discuss what kind of vulnerabilities exist in the Internet that allow hackers to exploit its weaknesses.

Episode 3: Bulletproofing the Ballot Box

There’s been a lot of anxiety lately about the security of the American balloting infrastructure, but Andrew Appel has been thinking about this question for years. He has research specialties in public policy and security and privacy. He’s a well-known specialist in election technology. 

Algorithms uncover cancers’ hidden genetic losses and gains

Limitations in DNA sequencing technology make it difficult to detect some major mutations often linked to cancer, such as the loss or duplication of parts of chromosomes. Now, methods developed by Princeton computer scientists will allow researchers to more accurately identify these mutations in cancerous tissue, yielding a clearer picture of the evolution and spread of tumors than was previously possible.

Episode 2: Why Online Media Platforms Get You Hooked

This is the second half of our conversation with Arvind Narayanan, associate professor of computer science here at the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science

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